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How to Help an Alcoholic Parent

alcoholic parent

When one thinks of alcoholism, the first thing that may come to mind is an image of a homeless person on the street corner with a brown paper bag. While this may be accurate for some cases, alcoholism is not just a problem that impacts those who are struggling financially. In fact, alcohol addiction can occur in any socioeconomic class and can affect any age group.

One group that is at a high risk for alcoholism are parents. Studies have shown that when one or both parents are addicted to alcohol, their children are more likely to also develop an addiction. It’s a dangerous situation… and one where you need to take action.

An alcohol rehab in Florida may be the answer for your parent. Call us today at 833.991.2955 to learn more.

Alcoholism Devastates Parents and Children

Alcoholism in the family takes a toll that can tear loved ones down. For example, when children see their parents abusing alcohol, they may learn that it is an acceptable way to behave. Additionally, when parents are addicted to alcohol, they may be less likely to provide a stable and nurturing home environment for their children. This can lead to emotional and behavioral problems for the child.

If you are the child of an alcoholic parent, it is important to seek out help as well. There are many support groups available for children of alcoholics, as well as individual therapy. It is also important to build a healthy support system of friends and family members who can provide a stable and positive influence in your life.

Clearly, alcoholism is a serious problem that can have an on-going and devastating impact on both parents and children. However, with the help of treatment and support, it is possible to overcome this addiction.

Tips to Help an Alcoholic Parent

If you have an alcoholic parent, there are ways that you can help them. The most important thing is to be supportive and understanding. You also need to be honest with them and set boundaries. Here are a few tips:

Talk to them about their drinking 

Be honest and tell them how their drinking is affecting you. Let them know that you want them to get help.

Set boundaries 

You need to make sure that you are taking care of yourself, too. Make sure that you aren’t doing all the work for your parent, and that you aren’t letting them take advantage of you. Let them know that you will not tolerate their drinking behavior. This includes things like not letting them drive drunk, not covering for them when they get in trouble with the law because of alcohol, and not giving them money to buy alcohol.

Encourage them to seek help 

There are many programs and support groups available for people with alcoholic parents. Encourage your parent to get help, and offer to go with them if they are reluctant.

Be supportive 

It can be tough when your alcoholic parent is going through treatment or struggling with sobriety. Be there for them, and offer encouragement. It’s easy to become discouraged by alcohol addiction. Your positive words and support can be a powerful support system for your parent.

Let them know that you are there for them 

That being said, you also need your own space. If you don’t take care of yourself, you can’t possibly take care of your alcoholic parent. They’re depending on you, even if they don’t know it or won’t admit it. Therefore, take care of yourself. 

Don’t enable their drinking 

This means not making excuses for them, or buying them alcohol. Don’t compromise and don’t strike bargains. For example, drinking three beers at a time instead of six isn’t the solution to an alcohol addiction.

Be positive 

Remember that there is hope, and your alcoholic parent can get better. Even though this may seem difficult at times, remember that people recover successfully from alcohol addiction every day.

Get Help For Your Alcoholic Parent

Don’t let a situation like this go unresolved. It’s time to act. Therefore, it’s time to call Recovery Bay Center today at 833.991.2955 and get your parent on the road to a safe, long-term recovery.